Punawaiola Ka Huli Ao Digital Archives| Ka Huli Ao Center for Excellence in Native Hawaiian Law| William S. Richardson School of Law

Journals of Legislatures of The Kingdom of Hawaiʻi

Legislative Council

House of Nobles

House of Representatives

Legislative Assembly

  • Journal, 1864. | PDF
    Journal, 1866. | PDF
    Journal, 1867. | PDF
    Journal, 1868. | PDF
    Journal, 1870. | PDF
    Journal, 1872. | PDF
    Journal, 1873. | PDF
    Journal, 1874. | PDF
    Journal, 1874. | PDF
    Journal, 1876. | PDF
    Journal, 1878. | PDF
    Journal, 1880. | PDF
    Journal, 1882. | PDF
    Journal, 1884. | PDF
    Journal, 1886. | PDF
    Journal, 1887. | PDF
    Journal, 1888. | PDF
    Journal, 1890. | PDF
    Journal, 1892, v.1. | PDF
    Journal, 1892, v.2. | PDF

Legislative Council (1840 – 1863)


A common reference to the bicameral legislature comprised of the House of Nobles, appointed by the King, and the House of Representatives, elected by the people. This body was succeeded by a unicameral Legislative Assembly by the Constitution of 1864. Minutes included cover the period 1841-1850.

House of Nobles (1840-1864)


Established by the 1840 Constitution during Kamehameha III’s reign as one of two legislative bodies comprising the Kingdom’s initial bicameral legislature, referred to as the Legislative Council, the House of Nobles’ members were appointed by the King, with the approval of the Privy Council. The initial group consisted of sixteen named individuals, including the King, and was charged with meeting annually “…for the purpose of seeking the welfare of the nation, and establishing laws for the kingdom.” It also served as a consultative body for the King. Members of its companion body, the House of Representatives, were elected by the people, with representatives from each of the major four islands. Proposed laws required majority approval from both the House of Nobles and the House of Representatives, and approval and signature by the King and the Premier.

This body was succeeded by a unicameral legislature in 1864, which also imposed property and literacy requirements for both legislature members and voters; these requirements were repealed in 1874.

Minutes included in Punawaiola cover the period 1851-1862.

House of Representatives (1840-1864)


Established by the 1840 Constitution during Kamehameha III’s reign as one of two legislative bodies comprising the Kingdom’s initial bicameral legislature, referred to as the Legislative Council, members of the House of Representatives were elected by the people, with representatives from each of the major four islands. The was charged with meeting annually “…for the purpose of seeking the interests of the kingdom.” Its companion legislative body was the House of Nobles, appointed by the King in consultation with the Privy Council. Proposed laws required majority approval from both the House of Nobles and the House of Representatives, and approval and signature by the King and the Premier.

This body was succeeded by a unicameral legislature in 1864, which also imposed property and literacy requirements for both legislature members and voters; these requirements were repealed in 1874.

Minutes included in Punawaiola cover the period 1854-1859.

Legislative Assembly (1864-1892)


Established by the 1864 Constitution under Kamehameha V, the Legislative Assembly, comprised of Nobles appointed by the King and representatives elected by the people, was the unicameral body succeeding the bicameral Legislative Council. With the advice of the Privy Council, the King convened the Legislative Assembly. Treaties and revenue measures were referred to the Legislative Assembly for its approval. From time to time, the King would inform by the Legislative Assembly of the state of the Kingdom.

Minutes included in Punawaiola cover the period 1864-1892.